Chargrilled Tuscan Lamb

Chargrilled Tuscan Lamb

Tradition dictates that barbecuing is a summer sport, but the method is ideally suited to cooking throughout the year.  Admittedly, you’re unlikely to get much success from an open barbecue in the driving rain, but a kettle bbq can account for most weather conditions, and effectively gives you an entire additional oven for cooking in.  Believe it or not, our Christmas lunch joints have been cooked on the barbecue for three years running now.

This is a beautiful, simple recipe that is ideally done over charcoal, but also works under a grill (broiler for our American friends).  It is a variation on a recipe from Maxine Clark’s fantastic book ‘Flavours of Tuscany’, which gives a range of traditional Tuscan recipes with an exciting modern twist.  Maxine is a cooking school teacher in Tuscany, so she knows her stuff.

Ingredients

2 kg leg of lamb
4 crushed garlic cloves
4 tbsp chopped rosemary
200 ml extra virgin olive oil
salt + pepper

to serve:
chopped Italian (flat leaf) parsley and good extra virgin olive oil

– Ask your butcher to bone and butterfly the lamb, or do it yourself by cutting towards the bone where it is closest to the skin, then trimming closely around the bone until you can remove it.

– The meat should lie fairly flat – place it skin side down and score through any areas that are thicker to even out the thickness, and remove excess fat.

– Mix all other ingredients together except for the salt and pepper and rub into the cut side of the meat.  Season with pepper only:

marinading lamb– Leave to marinate for a minimum of 1 hour or ideally overnight. Remove from the marinade and reserve any left over marinade for basting.

– If you have one, put the lamb into a square grill rack, which should allow for easier turning and control flare-ups:

grilling lamb

– Cook for around 30-40 min each side, basting every so often and turning regularly to ensure the surface does not burn.

– Once cooked, season with salt and rest in a warm place before slicing, then dress with the chopped parsley and olive oil.

Tips

– The picture above is actually a smaller leg of lamb than in the recipe (about 850g boned), so I just halved all the quantities and cooked for around 15 minutes each side.

– You will need to control flare ups if you’re cooking on an open barbecue – keep turning the meet and move it off the heat if the flames are out of control.  On a kettle barbecue, cook over direct heat with the lid on and all vents open, turning occasionally.

– Although I’ve given cooking timing guides above (which produce medium done meat), it is best to get familiar with the feeling of meat as the temperature of your barbecue could vary – have a look at this link.

Mint Sauce

mintAugust and September is the best time to harvest summer mint leaves for mint sauce – a versatile ingredient that is great in salad dressings as well as roast lamb.

Mint is an amazingly versatile herb equally at home in both sweet and savoury dishes, able to lift new potatoes or fresh peas to new levels of flavour or cut through rich curry dishes in raita.  Summer always brings a glut of mint to our garden, and the leaves are strewn extravangantly over even the most unlikely of meals (‘Any mint with your beans on toast?’).  But in these happy times the memory of winter lurks menacingly in the distance, and the time comes to squirrel away some of the leaves to secure the bright flavour for the coming seasons.

Mint Sauce

Ingredients
A handful of fresh mint leaves, stalks removed
Cider vinegar (enough to cover)
1tsp sugar

1. Chop the mint leaves finely.
2. Place in a ‘Kilner’ type jar as in the above photo.
3. Press down and pour in enough cider vinegar to cover.
4. Add sugar and mix thoroughly.

The sauce is ready after a few hours, but you’ll find the flavour will improve after a few weeks.  As well as the usual uses with roast lamb, mint sauce is great in salad dressings – mix a few tablespoons with honey, cracked black pepper and olive oil for a fantastic summer salad dressing.  Maybe not this summer though – looking out of my window it’s starting to feel distinctly wintery already…